[Review] Spider-Man: Homecoming – Watch Spider-Man: Homecoming 123movies online free

0
123
views
[Review] Spider-Man: Homecoming – Watch Spider-Man: Homecoming 123movies online free
5 (100%) 1 vote

Watch Spider-Man: Homecoming online free You will enjoy every single minute of this movie, Tom Holland is definitely the best peter Parker and Spider-Man we have ever seen. Marvel studios really did deliver with this one great action, humor, comedy, and much more. The villain in this movie who is the vulture is probably the best marvel movie villain ever, Michael Keaton gives his best portrayal of the role. This is not a iron man movie this is a straight Spider-Man movie that tells us his life before and after civil war and it all sums up very good.

Actor: Tom Holland, Michael Keaton, Robert Downey Jr.,

Director: Jon Watts,

Genre: Action, Adventure, Sci-Fi

Country: United States

IMDb: 7.6

Release: 2017

Review Spider-Man: Homecoming 123movies free – Watch Spider-Man: Homecoming 123movies online free

Review Spider-Man: Homecoming by William Harrison – A ‘spectacular’ Spider-Man movie that proves that Spider-Man’s still got it.

Jon Watts (Director of Clown and Cop Car) perfects the character and charm of Spider-Man that we all love from the comics without doing disservice to either fans of both the Raimi and Amazing Spider-Man franchises with a fun superhero movie oozing with joy with its great cast and characters, big and small, as well as an ‘amazing’ performance from Tom Holland who brilliantly combines what Maguire and Garfield brought to the character by truly demonstrating the differences and similarities between the awkward nerd Peter Parker and the quippy crime fighting Spider-Man. The film also gives many critics of Marvel’s lack of great villains what they want most, a relatable villain that is as, if not more, interesting than the hero itself and not only is great adversary physically but also psychologically and we see this with Michael Keaton’s excellent portrayal of the Vulture. What Spider-Man: Homecoming does best, however, is its attention to detail and world building put into the town of Queens, which feels more real and believable than any other fictional world we have seen in the MCU, making Spider-Man: Homecoming one of the best chapters of the Marvel Cinematic Universe and another great example for future superhero movies to learn from.

*** WATCH SPIDER – MAN: HOMECOMING FREE ***

Review Spider-Man: Homecoming Pyrocitor by – Welcome home, web-head

Spider-Fans are a thick-skinned lot. And, in watching his attempts to crawl onto the big screen, we’ve taken some gut-punches. From the early, fun-but-twee Sam Raimi days to the murky, Marc Webb hipster days (to say nothing of the nightmare of ‘Dancing Emo Peter’ – a farce of idiocy the character will be lucky to ever shrug off), we’ve watched our boy take more beats than a bout with Doctor Octopus. So, even finally! reacquainted with his REAL parents – a Marvellous accomplishment in itself – dare we hope? In the face of so much misguided corporate overreach, hackneyed tonal imbalance, flagrant disregard for comic backstory, and (shudder) hip-thrusts, dare we dream the dream of a half-decent cinematic Spider-Man, for the first time in more than some viewers’ lifetimes?

Rest easy, true believers: Homecoming is the best Spider-Man movie ever made.

Right from the playful strains of a certain familiar theme over the opening logos, it’s immediately apparent that Marvel Studios have not treated the reacquisition of their most beloved character lightly. Director Jon Watts’ film practically leaps off the screen with a bouncy, mischievous energy, snappy humour, and such a sheer outpouring of joy at its own existence (no tired teen angst here!) that it’s nigh impossible to resist grinning from start to finish. In contrast to the increasingly cosmic Marvel Cinematic Universe growing around it, Homecoming is winningly small and intimate: not only does Watts paint a love letter to the rough and tumble charm of Queens and its inhabitants, but the film’s stakes are not the fate of the world or universe, but, appropriately, the neighbourhood becoming less friendly.

It’s a hugely welcome tonic to blockbuster bloat, and the rare summer romp with space for characters to breathe. Watts channels Parker’s bustling eagerness for a higher calling into one of the most organic, truthful depictions of a modern high school, with a John Hughes ear for its stresses, infantilization, and small joys. One sequence, where Peter wrestles with the ethics of crashing a party as Spider-Man to raise his social standing to help bag a date to the titular dance, is so adorably true to the character it’s hard not to shed a tear in gratitude. It’s telling that we know and care more about Parker’s high school classmates than many of the B-tier, celebrity-cast superheroes in the MCU, and Laura Harrier, Zendaya, Tony Revolori (whose Flash, while no longer a jock, hits terribly credible cringeworthy notes of modern bullying), and especially Jacob Batalon (who sells many of the film’s comedic and emotional beats with surprisingly hilarious aplomb) flesh them out superbly. Paradoxically, the film’s grounded aesthetic also helps blend it into the MCU much more seamlessly than many of its cohort, reframing the MCU’s macro conflicts through a nonplussed ground level (upon an exquisitely tongue-in-cheek Chris Evans cameo, Parker’s teacher deadpans “or maybe he’s a war criminal now. I dunno”), while the House of Mouse cheerfully works in Star Wars swag at every turn.

But, in the midst of this uncharacteristically unassuming ‘world-building,’ for Marvel, the fun and thrills have not been left crammed into a locker. Watts’ action interludes are fizzy, raucous, clumsy (one car chase has Peter destroying – and chatting with – most of Queens in his inexperienced tenacity), and just as exhilarating as any of the bigger, brawnier Marvel counterparts. If anything, Watts infuses his blowouts with such worry Peter is in way over his head (his heroic intervention to the crumbling Washington Monument is interrupted by a panic attack from the altitude), that emotions are unprecedentedly ratcheted up for superhero combat. Even initial concerns of Spider-Man being too governed by Stark tech melt away in the face of Parker’s unquenchable enthusiasm in the face of his costume’s wacky potential, as his stacked super-suit cues many of the film’s biggest laughs (two words: ‘Intimidation Mode’), while Michael Giacchino’s twinkling score soars and lilts with the quintessence of Spider-Man.

Michael Keaton’s Vulture is unexpectedly terrifying, adding a uniquely aerodynamic to keep their tussles fresh and thrilling. Keaton’s idiosyncratic, bristling, and grimly heartfelt performance (a righteously indignant ‘working class hero’ antithesis to Tony Stark) takes what could have been another bland, disposable villain and makes him one of the most deceptively memorable and compelling of the MCU. There are the slightest wobbles in the web – the Shocker is fun but a touch underwhelming for such a cult classic Spider-foe, while Donald Glover’s cameo is amusing but superfluous. But in the face of the film’s relentless outpouring of fun and heart, including a third act twist as astonishingly unexpected as it is retroactively self- evident, they are less than inconsequential. And there is one sequence, ripped from the comic pages of the Lee/Ditko days, that is almost overwhelmingly emotional, anchoring the core ‘tireless underdog’ ethos of Spider-Man in tearfully perfect fashion.

And Tom Holland. Dear Tom Holland. To call his impish, earnest charisma perfect for Peter Parker would be an understatement – he’s almost achingly affable and human in and out of homespun or high tech costume, with a flair for pitch-perfect Spider-quips, raw vulnerability, and self-reproachful asides that are almost too lovable for words. In short, he is Spider-Man through-and-through. Supporting him, Robert Downey Jr. continues to find unexplored wrinkles in his eighth time embodying Tony Stark, and his clumsy ‘Uncle Tony’ mentoring (“my dad was never there for me, so, uh, breaking the cycle of shame”) is hugely amusing without overstaying his welcome. Marisa Tomei is too effervescently delightedly not to larb as Aunt May (now with more charm and less life lessons! Yay!), while Jon Favreau is reliably hilarious as the crusty Happy Hogan.

Homecoming doesn’t just do whatever a spider can – it redefines Spider-Man while showing unprecedented care and affection for what makes the character tick, all while teeming with humour, heart, humanity, and infectious fun. Soak it in, Spider-Friends. He’s home.

Review Spider-Man: Homecoming by Sara G (Saramargard) – Stellar movie…but what about Spider-man?

Oh Spider-Man, we meet again. It’s been a long time since we saw tantalizing Tobey Maguire in the suit. Spidey was in need of a comeback- oh wait, I forgot that already happened…Andrew Garfield this one is for you!

Okay but for real, this movie was great. It hit on every truthful aspect of Peter Parker. Geeky high school teen with great angst, a need to prove himself and get the girl he supposedly loves. I would 10/10 recommend it to anyone as one of the greatest Marvel movies every made (it definitely lived up to it’s reputation), but what about the greatest Spidey movie every made?

I agree that there has to be major differences between this movie and the other two heart-throb tales because Spider-Man is now official in league with the Avengers. But caught in the crossfires of the Marvel Legacy, was the movie even about Peter Parker? I mean, did they even have to try to make it about him? Everybody already knew the story so why bother retelling it? I believe a better title for the movie may have been Iron Man 4-Tony Stark’s Coming of Age.

The Marvel makers seemed to have realized that they already created a vast empire so adding in Peter Parker shouldn’t be difficult at all; if we remember to keep the main stars close behind…

I may still be a little too attached to the previous web of spidey movies to believe that Spider-Man is now part of something more than just himself, but it may have been nice to stick a little closer to the reality of Spider-Man’s true nature. He is a lonely, angsty teen from queens, but he seemed to be still on the back burner to the bigger starts cameo-ed in his own film. Maybe that was the point though…right?

Review Spider-Man: Homecoming by Hold_the_door – Spidey done right!

“Spider-Man: Homecoming” is the newest installment in the Marvel Cinematic Universe and a much needed Spider-Man reboot after the mess that the “Amazing Spider-Man” series were. This movie is actually a tie with Raimi’s “Spider-Man 2” for the best movie based on the character and Tom Holland, after this movie and his debut in last year’s “Civil War” is easily the best on-screen Spidey.

What I loved about this film is that it manages to introduce us to Peter Parker without showing us things that we know from all his previews movies. And if you don’t think that’s great enough, prepare for a funny, lighthearted, surprising, easter-egg filled, action-packed, stunning Summer blockbuster.

It’s also one of those rare comic book movies that the villain doesn’t feel wasted, thanks to Michael Keaton’s flawless performance. The rest of the cast does a great job too – with Zendaya being a standout, to my surprise.

To conclude, I believe “Homecoming” is a nearly perfect adaptation of the beloved Web shooter with barely any flaws that every fan (and non-fan) should see.

Review Spider-Man: Homecoming by ubaid_samadi – The best Spider-Man to date!

There was nothing wrong or bad about this movie. It was witty, comical and funny, and had many twists and turns along the way as well. I have been a big fan of Spider- Man for years and it was honestly better than the Spider-Man movies starring Tobey Maguire and much better than the Amazing Spider-Man movies starring Andrew Garfield. It stuck to its comical roots; Spider-man is just a young kid trying to prove himself. The Amazing Spider-man series focused too much on the action and tried to make the movie look cooler in 3-D and did not focus on the story-line too much. Homecoming had a perfect blend of action, drama, and story-line and that is what makes this movie great.

Go grab a popcorn and watch it in the cinema and have a blast!

Review Spider-Man: Homecoming by Ktdet – Watch Spiderman Homecoming You Review

Watch Spiderman Homecoming You Review. Love this movie. Best movie how Young Peter Parker Started out.

Spider-Man for the past 15 years. First there was Tobey Maguire, who under the direction of Sam Raimi for three films ushered in the modern superhero era, and then there was Andrew Garfield whose two films with Marc Webb were immediately forgettable. And now, like all obedient franchises, they’re trying to start all over again, this time with the much more age-appropriate Tom Holland in “Spider-Man: Homecoming.”

And you know what? Superhero cynicism aside, “Spider-Man: Homecoming” is really fun. Director Jon Watts, whose only previous feature film credit is the indie thriller “Cop Car,” has confidently put his stamp on the friendly neighborhood web slinger by making one bold move: actually casting teenagers to play teenagers.

Yes, after two films with late 20-somethings donning the Spidey suit and getting bitten by that pesky spider, Spider-Man finally gets to be a kid (and we get to skip over the whole origin/ Uncle Ben story). Instead, Watts’ film, which is upsettingly credited to six screenwriters, picks up with Peter Parker (Holland) right before, during and after the events of “Captain America: Civil War,” which introduced Holland’s Spider-Man in that epic airport Avengers battle.

Instead of a “last week in Marvel” segment to catch up, we’re given a refresher via Peter’s perspective. He’s just an excited kid who filmed the whole adventure and ever since has been thirsting for more Avengers action. He tries, endearingly, to prove his mettle on his own as he waits idly in Queens for a call from Tony Stark — giving directions to the elderly, retrieving stolen bikes and doing flips on command.

What he doesn’t know is that for eight years, there has been a supervillain emerging in his town in the form of a wronged construction worker, Adrian (Michael Keaton), who decided to break bad after losing a job to a government crew that clears post- superhero fight disaster areas. Peter, with his true-blue heart and naivete and eagerness to prove himself, of course takes on more than he can handle, while also trying to navigate high school, homework, crushes and the awkwardness of just being a teenager. Time passes easily and just when you might worry that you don’t actually care about any of the characters, the story throws a great curveball that carries interest to the end.

The film is overflowing with stellar talent, even in the smallest of roles and not counting the Marvel loaners in Robert Downey Jr. (who oozes charisma and charm even when phoning it in for a handful of scenes) and Jon Favreau. In the high school alone, there’s the too- cool Michelle (Zendaya), the crush Liz (Laura Harrier) and the adorable breakout best friend Ned (Jacob Batalon). Hannibal Buress and Martin Starr are there, too, to add reliable laughs. Adrian’s bad-guy crew includes Logan Marshall-Green and Michael Cernus. Even Spider-Man’s suit has an Oscar winner behind its voice (Jennifer Connelly).

Then of course there is Holland, a terrific actor since “The Impossible,” who is the perfect amount of empathetic, excitable and clueless to make Peter Parker work now and for years to come. For the most part, “Homecoming” is a joy. It’s light-hearted, smart, a little meta and the first Marvel film to really consider what it might be like for kids living in a world where superheroes are real.

My only quibble with “Spider-Man: Homecoming” is that for all of its charming and infectious realism about race, high school life and class issues, it has a bit of a woman problem. Simply: every significant and semi-significant female character looks like a model. It wouldn’t be an issue of the film not so spot-on with casting such a realistic variety of men and teenage boys, or if it were less concerned with hammering down on the “Aunt May is hot” bit that goes a little too far, but when taken together you start to wonder if maybe things would have been different if just one of the six screenwriters was a woman. But just as Peter has some growing up to do, so does this young franchise.

See more:

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here